Month: November 2014

roasted root vegetables with herbes de provence

Here is a seasonal root vegetables recipe inspired by a recent dinner at a friend’s place. Very easy to do, works well on it’s own or as a side dish. Take some Brussels sprouts, 1 yellow turnip (or swede or rutabaga all meaning the same), 2 turnips, 2 yellow carrots, some white cabbage and celery. Wash the Brussels sprouts and remove any yellow outer leaves, cut them in half. Peel the turnips, yellow turnip and carrots, cut them in cubes. Wash the cabbage and the celery and cut them in pieces. In a large bowl mix all the vegetables with some olive oil, salt, pepper and 1-2 teaspoons of herbes de provence spice mix. Place the veggies in a baking tray and cook in 175c for about 45 min. Check-in on them regularly to give the veggies a stir. Advertisements

eye test

You know those mornings when you wake up and you feel so tired that you have to double check that the alarm clock didn’t go off in the middle of the night? Again an early start on a dark morning, again another day of work ahead. Looking back at you from the mirror is a tired face with red spots and obvious indications of a bad hair day. You can’t fit into any of your clothes and you’re running late for  work. In the tram/bus/metro you see all those weird people looking fed up with their lives. It starts raining and everything outside looks so grey and miserable. “Great, just what I needed!” you think to yourself. Let’s rewind: You wake up in the dark room. You watch the silhouettes of trees dancing in the early morning darkness and you curve into bed for just a moment longer as it’s so nice and cosy. But you want to get up as you feel blessed to wake up to this new day, which will be a …

benefits of himalayan salt lamps

Improves Air-Quality Reduces allergens Boosts good mood and immunity Increases general well-being and mental clarity Has a relaxing effect Can help reduce symptoms of Seasonal Affective Disorder Improves sleep How does it work? Himalayan Salt Lamps act as natural negative ionizers. Negative ions are created in nature by moving water (rain, waterfalls, tide and waves on a beach), thunderstorms as well as sunlight. That is why the air feels so fresh and easy to breathe after a rain shower or on a beach. As the in-built light bulb gently heats the salt stone it starts to become humid. It will produce negative ions to the surrounding air improving overall air-quality and neutralizing positively charged ions created by electronic appliances, bacteria and allergens. Himalayan salt lamps have a soothing, relaxing effect; Partly because they charge the air around them with negative ions, partly because of the beautiful, warm light that they create. You can read more about the science and benefits behind negative ions for example HERE Himalayan salt lamps are available in health stores, just …

red quinoa salad

Ingredients: 2dl red quinoa (uncooked) 1dl chick peas rinsed 1/2 cucumber cut in cubes 2 big seeded tomatoes 2-3 scallions 150 g feta cheese 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon dried oregano 1-2 tablespoons sun flower seeds ½ teaspoon of Himalayan salt 1 tablespoon of balsamic vinegar juice of half a lemon ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper broccoli sprouts (optional) Boil the quinoa according to the instructions on the pack (average 15-20 min) and set it aside to cool. Seed & chop the tomatoes in small cubes, chop the cucumber and the scallions. Crumble the feta cheese. In a big bowl combine all the ingredients except from the broccoli sprouts and mix them well together. Add the broccoli sprouts on top of the dish when serving. If possible, leave the salad in the fridge for an hour or two before serving, this will make the flavors more intense. Serves 4.

05:30

This passage from Simon Hartley’s book Could I Do That? Really hits home on these dark mornings when my alarm goes off for an early morning practice. In it Hartley talks about his own challenge: “There is an interesting little conversation that goes on between my ears when the alarm clock goes off. It’s 5.15 am on a cold and dark December morning. My training schedule says ‘cycling’, which means an hour in the garage on the turbo trainer. I don’t know about your garage, but mine isn’t the most luxurious place on a wet, cold, dark winter’s morning. There is a temptation when that alarm clock goes off to hit the snooze button, or to switch it off or throw it across the room. As I hear the beeps, my brain starts to ask annoying questions. ‘Do I really need to get up? Could I do this later in the day? Is this session vital? If I decided to stay in bed, would it really make all that much difference?’ It is in these …